Is Your Menstrual Health in Jeopardy?

As women it's super important that we pay attention to not only our overall health, but specifically our menstrual health. Here are a couple warning signs that should not be ignored when it comes to your period.

Amenorrhea, or the slowing or stopping of your period.   

The most important thing to ask when your period stops is how old you are. According to WebMD, here are some normal reasons your period may have stopped: 

•Pregnancy 

•Too Much Exercise 

•Perimenopause or Menopause 

•Breastfeeding  However, you period may have stopped because of the following, which are far more of a health concern: 

Thyroid or pituitary gland disorders 

•Disorder of the hypothalamus (brain area that assists with reproductive hormone regulation) 

•Breastfeeding 

Obesity 

•Oral contraceptives (although birth control pills will usually just make the periods lighter, rather than stopping them entirely) 

•Stress 

Polycystic ovarian syndrome and other hormone imbalances 

•Ovarian failure (the loss of normal ovarian function before age 40) 

•Disease of the uterus (womb)

Menorraghia, or extremely heavy periods.

If you're losing more than 5 tablespoons of blood per month, your period is heavier than most women. This could be caused by a number of health issues such as fibroids, miscarriage, ectopic pregnancies, clotting disorders of possibly cancer.  

Extremely painful periods.  

If you're experiencing extreme pain, accompanied by nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting, you should contact your OB/GYN.  

Bleeding for more than 7 days straight.  

Although it may be normal to spot towards the end of your period, if you're bleeding heavily for more than 7 days, it's time to see your doctor who can prescribe medication or birth control to help control your period.  

Although these are all signs that your menstrual health may be in jeopardy, the best thing is to consult your OB/GYN. Don't spend hours on WebMD trying to self diagnose what might be wrong (and subsequently freaking yourself out in the meantime). Call up your doctor and play the better safe than sorry game.  

Cheer to your (menstrual) health!